growing an avocado

Growing avocados – Using an Avoseedo

Besides cooking and baking food, I also enjoy growing or (it, better said: attempting to grow my food). I’m certainly not a great gardener (yet?) but it gives me a lot of new opportunities for doing experiments. Such as this one: growing avocados, in the Netherlands. Yes, avocados are definitly not regularly grown here. But hey, a friend had two avoseedos (more on that later) and thus we had to try it out. Once we had that start of the plant, we just had to keep going…

Start of the avocado growing experiment

This experiment started in the first week of February of 2016. If I didn’t say otherwise at the end of this post, the experiment is still going strong! I somehow managed to take an avocado seed from a avocado imported from quite a distance of the Netherlands and make it into a plant!

And as mentioned above, it all started with an avocado.

Introducing: the Avoseedo

Avocados can be grown by floating the pit of an avocado in water. Over time, the avocado will start growing roots and little leaves, without any other food than plain tap water. Tricks to keep the pit flowing (it will sink if not supported) include toothpicks or: the Avoseedo. It’s this super smart and simple tool; it’s sort of a boat to keep the pit afloat.

All you have to do to eat the avocado flesh from your avocado. Clean the seed and gently remove the outer layer of the skin, don’t remove too much. Now fill a pot or vase (it’s nice if it’s transparant so you can follow the growth of roots!) with water and float the avoseedo in the water. Simply place the pit in the ‘boat’ and that’s it! Make sure the vase doesn’t run out of water and then all you have to do is wait.
the avoseedo floating in the water, ready for the pit to be planted

Three weeks later…

After three months of enjoying the sunshine (I placed the vase next to a window) and water several things have happened. First of all, after a few days small cracks appeared in the seed (I had read that this was supposed to happen so I got very excited :-).

A few more days of waiting and wow, I could see a root growing out of my avocado seed! Something was actually working. By now, three weeks after I ‘planted’ the seed, I have a root of about 5 cm in length and it’s still growing.

the root is starting to show
See that root!

5 weeks of avocado ‘growing’

In the next two weeks the root just continued to grow longer and longer until they are now touching the bottom of the vase (see photo below!). And then, one day, the first sign of a leaf appeared. It’s still small, but growning steadily. Curious to see what will happen next.

5 week avocado, long root, little plant
See, there, at the top? A little plant is coming out!

Avocado: 4 months old

Now, four months in, the plant had grown strong enough to be transferred to a pot! Its one root had become very strong and it actually showed a few small branches already. As you can see on the photo, the leaves have grown quite a bit as well.

So I got a nice large (hoping it will continue to thrive) pot and gave it some fresh earth. It’s in front of the window again, so it should get enough sun to continue growing.

avocado plant in pot, 4 months old
The vase + avoseedo, the home of the seed over the past 4 months can be seen in the background. The seed itself is enjoying its new home…

1 year & 4,5 month update

It’s still growing strong! The plant has now grown about 50 cm high, is still in the same pot and has made a lot of leaves already. It does require quite a bit of water (especially on warm days) and to us it seemed as if growth went a lot slower in winter than it does in summer.

No signs of course of any fruits, but the plant itself is still g(r)o(w)ing strong.

16,5 month avocado plant

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