Category - Food Science Basics

Food chemistry starts with atoms, molecules, drawings these molecules and then looking at their reactions. In this series we focus on food chemistry theory. Instead of actively applying food chemistry to certain reactions or phenomenon, we try to explain the basics here. They should provide just that little extra of background information to properly apply food chemistry on food around you.

Or have a look at: all posts on food chemistry, those focused on colour, or browning reactions.

Or take our food science basics course which also covers the essentials of food chemistry!

sedimentation experiment chocolate milk 10 min

Chocolate milk & Sedimentation

Nothing fits a good wintery day better than a warm chocolate milk, don’t you agree? The heat of the milk warms you up just a little and it gives you enough of a boost of energy to get going again. It’s a...

sauerkraut, ready for fermentation

Lactic acid fermentation in food

Yogurt, sauerkraut, pickles, none of these products would exist without lactic acid fermentation. This is a series of chemical reactions that transforms your ingredients into something pretty different (and delicious)...

fresh fruits on the cheesecak, ready for the last bake

Colours in fruits & vegetables

Fruits and vegetables have a great wide variety of colours. The spectrum goes from orange to purple to green to bright red. It’s amazing how nature has developed all these bright and beautiful colours. In most...

rock sugar kandijsuiker

Rock sugar, Bastognekoeken & Sugar crystallization

In the Netherlands we have this one cookie type that’s used for a lot of different dishes. They’re popular for use in cookie pie crusts, ice cream and a bunch of other recipes. Their name: Bastognekoeken...

chocolate and peanut butter dessert pouring over caramel sm

Sugar cooking & Temperature stages

Whenever making caramel, marshmallows, honeycomb or just about any other sugar candy you’ll often find that recipe either tells you to boil a sugar syrup to a certain temperature. Or, they’ll tell you to...

olive oil ice cream, super smooth

Freezing point depression (in ice cream)

Why is an ice cube rock solid whereas a scoop of Italian gelato is almost liquid like? Even a ‘simple’ popsicle isn’t as hard as a  pure water ice cube. Instead you can bite some off quite easily...

Food chemistry basics - what are emulsifiers

What are emulsifiers (in food)?

Ever tried to make a simple dressing of olive oil and balsamic vinegar? Noticed that it’s impossible to keep these two mixed without continuously stirring or adding something like mustard? Wondered how food...

Food chemistry basics - hydrophobic vs hydrophilic

Understanding hydrophilicity vs. hydrophobicity for food

Sometimes a term might be so familiar to you that you use it all the time, whereas another person, who doesn’t know that term, has no idea what you’re talking about. When talking about science that can be...